Every Shot Counts: Using the Revolutionary Strokes Gained Approach to Improve Your Golf Performance and Strategy

Columbia Business School professor Mark Broadie’s paradigm-shifting approach that uses statistics and golf analytics to transform the game. 
 
Mark Broadie is at the forefront of a revolutionary new approach to the game of golf.  What does it take to drop ten strokes from your golf score? What part of Tiger Woods’ game makes him a winner? Traditional golf stats can’t answer these questions. Broadie, a professor at Columbia Business School, helped the PGA Tour develop its cutting-edge strokes gained putting stat. In this eye-opening new book, Broadie uses analytics from the financial world to uncover the secrets of the game of golf. He crunches mountains of data to show both professional and amateur golfers how to make better decisions on the course.  This eagerly awaited resource is for any player who wants to understand the pros, improve golf skills, and make every shot count.

Reblogged 2 years ago from www.amazon.com

3 Comments

  1. HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR GOLF SCORE This is an excellent new book on simple strategies and ideas that will consistently help lower the average golfer’s scoring. While some of the tips deal with the fundamentals, the biggest and most important help comes from simply learning how to make smarter decisions after mistakes or the poor positions we 16+ handicap golfers frequently find ourselves in. I can clearly see how these decisions can be easily applied to legitimately cut 2-3+ strokes a round from the average weekend warrior’s…

  2. Golf By the Numbers, Numbers, and More Numbers Should you go for the green or lay up? Putt aggressively or die the ball into the hole? Who scores better, a good driver or a good putter? Quantitative researcher Mark Broadie, a professor at Columbia Business School, member of the USGA handicap research team, and former club champion at Pelham CC, applied the same rigorous statistical methods used by Wall Street’s quants to the game of golf to find the answers to these and other major questions of golf strategy. You’ll be…

  3. Better than expected I have great respect for Mark Broadie’s research, and highly anticipated this book. It’s better than expected.Using new analytic methods (for golf at least), the book comes up with several major points about scoring and shot making. Interesting, the early work of Cochran and Stobbs (1971) came up with some of the same conclusions.1) Long game approach shots are most important.2) Long driving (as long as fairly straight) is better than short and straight.3)…