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The Complete Hogan: A Shot-by-Shot Analysis of Golf’s Greatest Swing

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Top golfing instructor Jim McLean uses rare film footage of Ben Hogan to break down the greatest swing of all time

Golf legend Ben Hogan had the perfect golf swing, but how exactly it worked has long been a mystery?until now. Using footage from three never-before analyzed films of Hogan at his very best, Jim McLean analyzes the crucial motions of Hogan’s entire golf swing and shows you how to integrate his mechanics into your own game. You’ll study Hogan’s blend of club head, club shaft, hands, ankles, knees, hops, shoulders, and head motion?a symphony of movements with an ideal sequential development of power. It’s as close as you can get to teeing it up with Hogan yourself.Uses more than one hundred stills from three rare films to analyze every key detail of Hogan’s perfect swing before the car accident that changed his play, something no book on Hogan has ever doneReveals the fifteen secrets of Hogan’s swing, covering important topics such as the grip, the waggle, the left hip action, lateral motion, rotation and turning movements, head position, and moreDraws extensively on the knowledge of Hogan’s friends and competitors, many of them golfing greats themselvesWritten by one of Golf Digest’s top five teachers , a pioneer in video analysis who also saw Hogan play first hand

There have been many books on Hogan’s swing, but never one, including his own, that illustrates his swing at its most perfect, and never one that shows its mechanics so clearly and completely.Top golfing instructor Jim McLean uses rare film footage of Ben Hogan to break down the greatest swing of all time

Golf legend Ben Hogan had the perfect golf swing, but how exactly it worked has long been a mystery?until now. Using footage from three never-before analyzed films of Hogan at his very best, Jim McLean analyzes the crucial motions of Hogan’s entire golf swing and shows you how to integrate his mechanics into your own game. You’ll study Hogan’s blend of club head, club shaft, hands, ankles, knees, hops, shoulders, and head motion?a symphony of movements with an ideal sequential development of power. It’s as close as you can get to teeing it up with Hogan yourself.Uses more than one hundred stills from three rare films to analyze every key detail of Hogan’s perfect swing before the car accident that changed his play, something no book on Hogan has ever doneReveals the fifteen secrets of Hogan’s swing, covering important topics such as the grip, the waggle, the left hip action, lateral motion, rotation and turning movements, head position, and moreDraws extensively on the knowledge of Hogan’s friends and competitors, many of them golfing greats themselvesWritten by one of Golf Digest’s top five teachers , a pioneer in video analysis who also saw Hogan play first hand

There have been many books on Hogan’s swing, but never one, including his own, that illustrates his swing at its most perfect, and never one that shows its mechanics so clearly and completely.

Reblogged 2 months ago from www.amazon.com

Comments

Anonymous says:

The Jim McLean writing is not the reason to by this book, the Hogan photo sequences are. McLean makes some salient observations about the Hogan swing, but in my opinion applies too much of his X-factor/slot swing philosophy to his interpretations of the Hogan action. While I can’t argue that the modern touring pro golf swing involves a lot of hip turn restriction, I’m not convinced that’s the best way for most amateurs particularly those over 35 or so to play or learn the game…

Anonymous says:

Love the book and agree with those who say it is remarkable and amazing. McLean thoroughly analyzes Hogan’s swing using stills from films of Hogan taken when he was at his peak physically; relates his insights about Hogan from knowing him personally and playing golf with him and from talking to many other well known golfers who knew Hogan; and provides brief reviews of other works about Hogan. Some people who reviewed the book fault McLean for referring to his other books and to his own…

brandon says:

what could have been

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